Floating Offshore Wind

The Carbon Trust are at the forefront of the emerging floating offshore wind sector

Why Floating Wind?

As installed capacity for offshore wind increases and the relatively accessible shallow near-shore sites are exhausted, wind farms using fixed-bottom foundations will need to be developed further from shore and in deeper water, which will pose greater technical challenges and constrain efforts to reduce costs. In response to this challenge, momentum is building around the potential for floating offshore wind technology to unlock deep water sites at a cost that is competitive with other energy technologies. The ability to harness strong wind resource in deep water locations can enable floating wind turbines to deliver high volumes of low carbon electricity to the grid. Exploiting deep water locations can also open new markets for offshore wind power, with considerable potential in Europe, East Asia, and North America.

Floating wind turbines

The Carbon Trust and Floating Wind

The Carbon Trust are at the forefront of the emerging floating offshore wind sector, having published an industry-leading report - the Floating Offshore Wind Market Technology Review - and set up a pioneering joint industry project to investigate the challenges and opportunities of this fast evolving technology. Carbon Trust analysis, based on extensive engagement with industry, has highlighted considerable cost reduction potential for floating wind, reaching levels which would be competitive with conventional fixed-bottom wind farms, if commercialised within the next decade. The Carbon Trust are continuing to work closely with both government and industry in understanding the opportunities and barriers for the sector, both within the UK and internationally. Namely, Carbon Trust have supported government departments in the UK, Japan and Taiwan with their cost reduction strategies.

For more information on Carbon Trust activity in floating offshore wind, please contact Rhodri James (Info@CarbonTrust.com).

 

Banner photo source: Statoil

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